Pam Alexander-Schneider Appointed to Texas ICAOS

Image of the judge, Ms. Alexander-Schneider and a Lubbock County deputy during the swearing in. Caption reads, Judge Bill Sowder officiates , swearing in Pam Alexander-Schneider as a member of the Texas Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision March 8, 2017.

By C J Oakes, Contributor

Pam Alexander-Schneider, Executive Director of Lubbock Victim Assistance Services, Inc. of Lubbock, Texas was recently sworn March 8, 2017 as a member of the Texas Council for Interstate Adult Offenders Supervision. Family, friends, LVAS personal, law enforcement, and district attorneys were present as Judge Bill Sowder of the 99th District Court officiated the appointment ceremony on behalf of Governor Greg Abbott who could not be present.

What will this new role mean for Ms. Alexander-Schneider and the Lubbock community?

The Texas Council for Interstate Adult Offender Supervision

Image of Lubbock County deputy flanked by family of Pam Aalexander-Schneider during the ceremony. Caption reads, Family and friends listen as Judge Bill Sowder of the 99th Circuit Court in Lubbock, Texas explains the role of ICAOS Board Members in keeping victims safe from violent convicts.
Family and friends listen as Judge Bill Sowder of the 99th District Court in Lubbock, Texas explains the role of ICAOS Board Members in keeping victims safe from violent convicts.

The Interstate Compact for the Supervision of Parolees and Probationers was established in 1937 to provide a means by which offenders out of prison on parole could travel, if necessary and approved, between the states. It was formed because the states recognized that some parolees and probationers may have a legitimate reason to relocate out of the state in which they were sentenced and/or incarcerated. When such a relocation takes place, however, the state holding legitimate claim to their lives until they have met the terms of their parole/probation would need a way to continue tracking their progress despite them leaving the jurisdiction.

When a relocation takes place, the state having oversight of those convicted of crimes not yet cleared by conditions of parole/probation need a way to continue tracking their progress despite them leaving the jurisdiction.

A compact between the states was the solution.

Judge Sowder reads the oath of office as member of the ICAOC Texas chapter with Pam Alexander-Schneider affirming aloud the same.
Judge Sowder reads the oath of office as member of the ICAOC Texas chapter with Pam Alexander-Schneider affirming aloud her agreement.

The ICSPP served the nation well, but by 1998, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) recognized a need to revise the original compact between the states. So, in 2000, the Interstate Compact for Adult Offender Supervision (ICAOC) was recommended to the states and by 2002, 35 had ratified the agreement.

The duties of the ICAOC include:

  • the creation of rules for reaching organizational goals
  • providing a way for jurisdictions and victims to have input into offender relocation decisions
  • providing a way to notify jurisdictions and victims of a relocation in a timely manner
  • the uniform collection of data related to offender relocations
  • providing access to important offender information needed by law enforcement and other justice system officials
  • coordination of activities with public officials having oversight of persons under the control of the department of corrections, law enforcement, the courts, and related organizations.
  • monitoring compliance
  • initiates non-compliance interventions with the necessary authorities
  • provides training as needed to ensure offender movement regulations are properly implemented.

Each state has a chapter of the ICAOC. To learn more about each state chapter of the organization, visit http://www.interstatecompact.org/Directory/RegionsStates.aspx.

The Role of Pam Alexander-Schneider in the Texas Chapter of he ICAOC

Image of the judge, Ms. Alexander-Schneider and a Lubbock County deputy during the swearing in. Caption reads, Judge Bill Sowder officiates , swearing in Pam Alexander-Schneider as a member of the Texas Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision March 8, 2017.
Judge Bill Sowder officiates, swearing in Pam Alexander-Schneider as a member of the Texas Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision March 8, 2017.

As a council member, Ms. Alexander-Schneider will participate in setting the rules and regulations for parolees being paroled to Texas from other states. As the Director of LVAS, she is the voice for victims of violent crimes in setting those rules and regulations. Said Ms. Alexander-Schneider,

“Victims of violence have the same needs and outcomes across our nation. They want to feel safe and protected when it comes to their offenders and other offenders that are released on parole.”

In keeping with that statement, her new duties with the ICAOC dovetail nicely with the Mission of Lubbock Victim Assistance Services, which you may read here.

In addition to LVAS and the ICAOC, Ms. Alexander-Schenider also oversees the activities of Speak Out Lubbock, an organization dedicated to helping prevent substance-impaired driving. Those impaired by alcohol and other substances account for untold misery on our streets and highways. Although DUI/DWI is not listed as a violent crime, the effects are just as harrowing, with victims suffering years or decades of trauma because of horrific accidents.

To better understand the role of Speak Out Lubbock in the South Plains and how DWI/DUI impact lives, check out a few of these videos.

Congratulations to both Pam Alexander-Schneider and the citizens of the South Plains. She, for the honor of being called to serve in this important organization and those of us living in Lubbock because she will surely continue to help make our community a better place in which to live and raise families.

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Rebuilding to Better Serve You

For more than a decade, Lubbock Victims Assistance Services has been working tirelessly to help victims of violent crime in the South Plains. During that time we had a simple website and although we had plans to enhance the site to better serve our community, it seemed there were always more pressing matters.

That has changed, largely because we had a benefactor who asked to remain nameless on this site, come to our aid. He is in the process of rebuilding the site so that we can better serve victims of violence in Lubbock. We ask that you be patient with us during this time.

Lubbock Victims Assistance Services is Still Here to Help You

Of course, we never went anywhere and we are always here to help those who have been victimized by violent crime in our community. As you will see, the new site structure makes our phone number and email address better seen. In addition, we are adding resources we lacked before.

English: Supporters of domestic violence victi...
English: Supporters of domestic violence victims look at an Empty Plate/Silent Witness display, Wednesday, at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. The place settings memorialize victims of domestic violence in the Hawaii Army community. The display was a part of a proclamation signing ceremony that outlines the Army’s commitment to protecting victims of domestic violence. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

For instance, not only are we adding pages for each of the programs available to victims of violent crime in Lubbock and the South Plains but also adding national resources, help lines, a directory of local social services, and useful links. More than this, we have included an education section which we hope will be most beneficial to victims.

When a person experiences a traumatic experience such as personal violence, they often do not know where to turn for help. Some are embarrassed, ashamed, or feel guilty. Often, victims will hide away, fearful of what others will think of them–and never get the help they need to recover.

While there is no reason to feel guilty or ashamed when victimized, these feelings are natural. It is our hope that by adding educational pages and videos that victims can view or read in their own home, they can get the help they need without fear of exposure. This, in turn, may encourage some to step forward and seek the help that Lubbock Victims Assistance Services provides.

Community Involvement, Donations, and News

In addition to the resources and educational information we will add to our new website, we are adding a Members Section where we encourage our neighbors to get involved.

Violence is not confined to the dark alleys of major cities. In fact, as reported by KCBD in an article discussing domestic violence in 2012,

“Panhandle and South Plains Per Capita Death Rate Higher Than in Any of the Larger Urban Areas.”

English: Domestic violence victim advocacy: ex...
English: Domestic violence victim advocacy: expression and bonding thru live music events; op music house (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The fact is that violence can happen at any time to anyone, anywhere, but in Lubbock and the South Plains, domestic violence is one of the biggest dangers we face.

For this reason, we encourage everyone reading this to become members of this site. As members, you will be notified of important events related to preventing violence in Lubbock along with email notifications of new posts and pages added to this site. This will keep you informed and educated.

Although current research indicates that education has no impact on domestic violence, learning how to deal with the aftermath can help victims better cope with their situation.  Thus, the pages on this site will focus on coping mechanisms, ways to regain dignity after violence touches home, and how to deal with the shame and guilt associated with violent acts.

Finally, we know that many in the community would like to offer financial support for the mission of Lubbock Victims Assistance Services when possible. So, for those whose hearts impel them, we will be adding a simple way to contribute. We thank you for your support.